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The Jefferson City Historic Preservation Commission recognizes properties with historical significance and contribution to the community with the Landmark Award. Since 1993, the commission has recognized several buildings or properties as Landmark properties annually. The awards are presented to the property owners each May.

The News Tribune has explored the history of many of these Jefferson City Landmarks. Click the links below to read more of their stories.

Temple Beth El
Temple Beth El, 318 Monroe St.

Temple Beth El, 318 Monroe St. — The oldest active temple west of the Mississippi River, Jefferson City's Temple Beth El is the 14th oldest temple still in use in the United States. It was named a Landmark in 1993.

Jefferson City Community Center, 608 E. Dunklin St. — More than 70 years after the building opened, the mission as a community center continues. Originally the Jefferson City Community Center, 608 E. Dunklin St. now is the Eastside Family Activity Center. It was named a Landmark in 1993.

Parsons House, 105 Jackson St. — The blue clapboard and limestone home at 105 Jackson St. has felt the blood of wounded soldiers drip on its floors when it was used as a hospital. And the home has seen a wedding of a president's kin in the city named after him. It was named a Landmark in 1993.

Marmaduke House, 700 E. Capitol Ave. — Convict labor formed bricks and carved limestone on site at the Missouri State Penitentiary to erect the warden's home at 700 E. Capitol Ave. in 1888. It was named a Landmark in 1993.

Missouri State Penitentiary Housing Unit 4 /A Hall — Housing Unit 4 is the oldest standing housing unit on the historic Missouri State Penitentiary site. It was named a Landmark in 1993.

Dulle House, 800 St. Marys Blvd. — More than the fact that five generations have lived in the same home, the 1858-built brick structure holds a claim to historical fame only one other remaining building in town can boast. Union Gen. John Fremont reportedly set up Camp Lilly on the hillside. Military historians confirm that protocol dictates the general would have made his headquarters in the home during the War Between the States. It was named a Landmark in 1994.

Richmond Hill Grocery, 628 W. Main St. — By the time the Bolivar and Main streets area reached its peak of growth and stability at the turn of the 20th century, the Richmond Hill Grocery was at the heart of this mixed-use area, settled primarily by first-generation German immigrants. It was named a Landmark in 1994.

St. Peter Catholic Church, 216 Broadway St. — St. Peter Catholic Church, though not the oldest church in Jefferson City, has become an historic pillar of the downtown area. It was named a Landmark in 1994.

Union Pacific Depot
Union Pacific Depot, 301 State St.

Union Pacific Depot, 301 State St. — The Romanesque Revival-style depot at the north end of Monroe Street is one of the most recognizable buildings in Jefferson City. It was designated a Landmark in 1994.

Jefferson City National Cemetery and City Cemetery, 900 and 1000 blocks of East McCarty St. — Burials at the National Cemetery first date back to the summer of 1861. This National Cemetery is unique in that War Between the States veterans are buried together, regardless of which side they fought on. It was designated a Landmark in 1994.

International Shoe Building, 1101 E. Capitol Ave. — The shoe industry was a big money maker in Jefferson City, especially during the era of prison labor. The International Shoe Building was one of several industries built apart from the controversial inmate labor pool. It was named a Landmark in 1995.

McClung Park, 1114 Chestnut St. — A military encampment, a state park and even a theater, McClung Park has played host to a diverse number of uses. It was named a Landmark in 1995.

Villa Panorama Mansion, 1310 Swifts Highway — More than 100 years old, Villa Panorama went through a number of incarnations before Michael and Carolyn Mills revived its elegance. It was named a Landmark in 1995.

Monaco House, 1122 Moreau Drive — The original builder abandoned Vineyard Place before exterior work was complete in the 1840s. When Nick and Mildred Monaco bought the Jefferson City home, they discovered the original plat book in the basement and completed the original architect's vision in the 1960s. It was named a Landmark in 1996.

Grace Episcopal Church, 217 Adams St. — Social development in Jefferson City has been influenced by the nearly 180-year presence of the Episcopalian church. The present church building was completed in 1901. It was named a Landmark in 1996.

B. Gratz Brown House, 109 Madison St. — Benjamin Gratz Brown was involved in the planning and construction of the current Missouri Governor's Mansion. Across Madison Street, Brown had three Federal-style row houses built by St. Louis architect George Ingham Barnett, also the mansion's designer. 109 Madison St. was named a Landmark in 1996.

Bodtenschats Buehrle House, 707 Washington St. — A fine example of the German architectural style, the Buehrle House "is historically significant because of the integrity and purity of its design," according to the Historic Preservation Commission. It was named a Landmark in 1996.

Winan’s Gallery/Caplinger’s Clothing, 207 E. High St. — For nearly a century, 207 E. High St. was a staple of men's fine clothing in Jefferson City. It was named a Landmark in 1996.

Warwick Village, 1507 E. McCarty St. — When the automobile was new, traveling opened up to a wider public. Roadside motels, fuel stations and restaurants cropped up to serve them on their treks. Such was the case with the Warwick Village Motel. It was named a Landmark in 1997.

First United Methodist Church — First United Methodist Church's current sanctuary and subsequent expansions still stand in the 300 block of Capitol Avenue, more than 100 years after the construction of architect Charles Opel's design. It was named a Landmark in 1997.

Lohman's Landing
Lohman's Landing, 100 Jefferson St.

Lohman's Landing, 100 Jefferson St. — Before 1839, when James Crump built what is know now as the Lohman Building, Jefferson City was a frontier town. The building was named a Landmark in 1997.

Governor's Mansion and Garden, 100 Madison St. — The distinguished Governor's Mansion sits on the same bluff where Missouri's first legislative session was held in the Capital City in 1826. It was named a Landmark in 1998.

Burch-Berendzen Grocery Building, 304 E. High St. — From groceries to men's fine clothing to attorney's offices, the Burch-Berendzen Grocery at 304 E. High St. has had its share of interior makeovers. It was named a Landmark in 1998.

Carnegie Library, 212 Adams St. — The opulent interior and distinguished exterior were a testament to the pride Jefferson City felt when Andrew Carnegie agreed in 1900 to financially support the building of a permanent free, public library. It was named a Landmark in 1998.

Houchin House, 611 E. Capitol Ave. — Jim and Betty Weber rehabilitated the building that was once home to James Houchin, owner of the Star Clothing Company inside the Missouri State Penitentiary. Bella Vista Apartments replaced its massive and elegant gardens. It was named a Landmark in 1999.

Cliff Street Mansion, 722 Cliff St. — The backyard view of the Missouri River from the Cliff Street Mansion is as beautiful today as it was advantageous for the Union soldiers who occupied the site as Fort College Hill during the Civil War. It was named a Landmark in 1999.

Pat's Place, 700 W. Main St. — Generations of Jefferson Citians have found camaraderie and libation at the corner of 700 W. Main St. It was named a Landmark in 2000.

Democrat Building, 300 E. High St. — The Democrat Building was built by Joseph Richard Edwards as the office for the weekly Cole County Democrat newspaper. It was named a Landmark in 2000.

Asel Home, 210 Lafayette St. — This Queen Anne-style home's interior features have remained intact through nine owners. It was named a Landmark in 2000.

United States Post Office, 131-133 W. High St. — The United State Post Office at 131-133 W. High St. has been a hub of activity since it opened in 1934. It was named a Landmark in 2000.

McHenry Home, 1427 Green Berry Road — In addition to building a home that became a city-designated Landmark, Houck McHenry also built one of the finest telephone systems in the United States. The home was designated a Landmark in 2001.

Governor Office Building, 200 Madison St. — The Governor Office Building, once the Hotel Governor, has two historic legacies. The first began in the 1940s as a central and essential hotel, serving as meeting place for political, business and romantic liaisons. The second began in the late 1990s when developer Bruce Cohn rejuvenated a sad downtown structure, setting a new precedent for the economic potential of viable older buildings in Jefferson City. It was named a Landmark in 2001.

Immaculate Conception Church, 1206 E. McCarty St. — Inside a small house at the corner of then-U.S. 50 and Clark Avenue in Jefferson City, a new Catholic parish celebrated its first Mass the last Sunday in July 1913. It was named a Landmark in 2001.

Old Moreau Heights School Building
Old Moreau Heights School Building, 900 Moreau Drive.

Old Moreau Heights School Building, 900 Moreau Drive — In 1913, Jefferson City voters passed the largest bond proposal yet to expand the high school on Hobo Hill and to build two new grade schools, including Moreau Heights. Today it houses the Moreau Montessori School. It was named a Landmark in 2001.

Hess House, 714 Washington St. — A simple, distinctive German home, the Hess House witnessed the War Between the States while the immigrant neighborhood grew quickly around it in the early 1860s. It was named a Landmark in 2001.

Architects Alliance Building, 631 W. Main St. — Although altered several times, the building at 631 W. Main St. is one of a handful of remnant architecture of what once was the industrial Millbottom area of Jefferson City. Today, it houses the offices of The Architects Alliance. It was named a Landmark in 2002.

Kelly-Bolton Home, 1916 Green Berry Road — Possibly the oldest brick home in Cole County, the Kelly-Bolton Home has ties to early pioneers, Civil War soldiers and turn-of-the-century society. It was named a Landmark in 2002.

Oscar Burch Home, 924 Jefferson St. — The Oscar Burch House was built in 1865 and has undergone numerous renovations. It was named a Landmark in 2002.

Dix Apartments, 623 E. Capitol Ave. — The two-story brick building most recently known as Avenue HQ, influenced by Classical Revival, was originally built as apartments. Named a Landmark in 2003, it was demolished in September 2019 after damage from the May 2019 tornado.

Jefferson Female Seminary, 416-420 State St. — Once a place to educate young women in the finer points of knowledge and etiquette, today the Greek Revival-style buildings at 416-420 E. State St. are a reference for those learning about revitalization. The site was named a Landmark in 2003.

Old West End School, 1107 W. Main St. — In 1903, this building was Jefferson City's long anticipated West End School. Today, the Neo-Jacobean style building is called Schoolhouse Apartments. It was named a Landmark in 2003.

Tweedie's Shoes, 122 E. High St. — The Tweedie Footwear Corporation once filled the north end of Jefferson Street with factories after moving out of its original Jefferson City location inside the Missouri State Penitentiary. The building was named a Landmark in 2004.

Schmidt Apartments, 318 Jefferson St. — The Spanish-style, two-story stucco Schmidt Apartments building in the 300 block of Jefferson Street catches most people's eyes. Its location has always been at the center of city activity. It was named a Landmark in 2004.

Louis Ott House
Louis Ott House, 1201 Moreau Drive.

Louis Ott House, at 1201 Moreau Drive — A cornerstone of Jefferson City's east-side neighborhood, born of the streetcar and expanded Capitol grounds, the Louis Ott House is a symbol of the early 20th century affluence. It was named a Landmark in 2004.

Sommerer House, 2023 W. Main St. — When the John Sommerer Sr. family moved into their "dream home" in 1929 from living next to their east-side bakery, the home with Italian Renaissance- and Prairie-style influences sat on about 12 acres, extending to the railroad tracks and to West Elementary School. It was named a Landmark in 2004.

Towles-Buckner House, 612 E. Capitol Ave. — A cozy, red brick Queen Anne-style home on Capitol Avenue in Jefferson City bears the names of its first owner and another who restored it nearly a century later. It was named a Landmark in 2004.

George and Judith Goff Home, 1025 Adams St. — The unique, arched entry to The Villa with double wooden doors, ornate hinges and stained glass windows put it in local artist Mary Ann Hall's "Grand Entrances" work a few years ago. It was named a Landmark in 2005.

Dallmeyer Home, 600 E. Capitol Ave. — Frank and Carol Burkhead operated their accounting business out of William Q. Dallmeyer's late 1800s-built home after buying and renovating it. Named a Landmark in 2005, it was demolished in December 2019 after damage from the May 2019 tornado.

Kas A Designs, 308 W. Dunklin St. — When the Schwartzott family built the East Lake-style home atop a steep Jefferson City bluff on the south side of Wears Creek in the 1870s, Dunklin Street ended on the same level as its front door. Today, it is more than a story above the main thoroughfare in Old Munichburg and houses Kas A Designs. It was named a Landmark in 2005.

Exchange Bank Clock, 132 E. High St. — The freestanding clock at the corner of High and Madison streets in downtown Jefferson City has been a rendezvous location for businessmen and a point of reference for visitors for over 80 years. It was named a Landmark in 2005.

O'Donoghue's Steak and Seafood, 900 E. High St. — At the turn of the 20th century, Peter Kaullen was proud of opening his mercantile at 900 E. High St. At the turn of the 21st century, Juanita Donehue was determined to restore that three-story, German vernacular as home to her restaurant. It was named a Landmark in 2005.

Rotary Centennial Park — The first Missouri River bridge in outstate Missouri was opened in 1896 at the north end of Bolivar Street. Today, the remnant of that turnstyle, toll bridge has been transformed into the Rotary Centennial Park. It was named a Landmark in 2006.

The Prison Wall, Lafayette Street and Capitol Avenue — "The Walls," as the Missouri State Penitentiary was commonly known, are perhaps the most distinctive characteristic of the historic prison site. The prison wall was named a Landmark in 2006.

Tergin Apartments, 201 W. McCarty St. — George Tergin loved the Capital City and its downtown, so much so that he built his home within two blocks of the statehouse. A century later, his grandchildren continue to operate a downtown Jefferson City business. The building was designated a Landmark in 2006.

St. Peter School, 314 W. High St. — St. Peter Interparish School's oldest building also houses a piece of the community and state's history. It was named a Landmark in 2007.

Henriette Rieger House, 801 Washington St. — Once one of many, a German cottage at 801 Washington St. in Jefferson City was home to a clergyman's widow while raising their six children. It was named a Landmark in 2007.

Garden Gate Building, 111-113 E. High St. — Jefferson City was in the midst of the Civil War and tenuous times in the 1860s when this building was constructed in downtown's commercial hug. It was named a Landmark in 2008.

124-126 E. High St. — One of the "newer" buildings in the block, built in the 1920s, the property replaced a turn-of-the-century building, which housed the "Clean Sanitary Grocery" store. It was named a Landmark in 2008.

Coca-Cola Bottling Company, 604 Jefferson St. — The centennial, family-owned business was named a Landmark in 2008.

Monroe Plaza, 422 Monroe St. — Across the downtown skyline, only the Capitol stands taller than the Doubletree Hotel by Hilton, whose distinctive, round design has caught the attention of visitors and residents alike for more than 40 years. It was named a Landmark in 2008.

Ira Lohman House, 1107 Moreau Drive — John Schaper designed this two-story brick home for attorney Ira Lohman, whose law practice was growing, in 1937. It was named a Landmark in 2008.

Hawkins-Herman Home
Hawkins-Herman Home, 1005 Adams St.

Hawkins-Herman Home, 1005 Adams St. — Only two owners have lived in this Classic English Tudor-style home. The first occupant, Alfred Hawkins built the home about 1930 for his wife, who had original plans from her birth home in England. It was named a Landmark in 2009.

Cook-Nixon Home,1208 Elmerine Ave. — In a Jefferson City neighborhood where several Missouri governors have made their home before being elected into the Executive Mansion, 1208 Elmerine Ave. hosted many a reception for newly elected governors as well as being home to former Gov. Jay Nixon. It was named a Landmark in 2009.

Towne Grill, 315 Jefferson St. — Whether at the narrow, wait-in-line location on Madison Street or in its current location that seats about 40, Towne Grill is a Landmark, named so in 2009.

The Sunken Garden, 1110 Moreau Drive — An exotic escape once grew along Moreau Drive, hidden in a sunken garden behind the century-old home built by William and Katheryn Mueller. It was named a Landmark in 2009.

Dr. Robert E. Young Home, 516 E. Capitol Ave. — Dr. Robert Young's home at 516 E. Capitol Ave. was built by his father in 1872, just as the majority of homes along that stately road were after the Civil War. It was named a Landmark in 2010.

Joseph and Elizabeth Wallendorf House, 701 S. Country Club Drive — With ties to agriculture through early German immigrants and to national history through a Civil War battle that almost was, the Wallendorf Log Home certainly is a historic Jefferson City Landmark, named so in 2010. To preserve it, the Missouri Farm Bureau relocated the double dogtrot style cabin from its original location at Edgewood Drive and Missouri 179.

Nieghorn House, 120-122 E. Dunklin St. — John Nieghorn left his home in Bavaria to settle in Mid-Missouri in the mid-1840s. His house, built in 1892, was named a Landmark in 2010.

Cole County Jail-Sheriff’s House, 301 E. High St. —Probably quite a grand perk to the job of county sheriff in the 1930s, the two-story limestone home was built adjacent to his workplace. It was named a Landmark in 2010.

Washington Park Shelter House, 1203 Missouri Blvd. — When the Jefferson City Host Lions Club sponsored the Works Progress Administration to build a limestone pavilion at Washington Park, it was a place for families to picnic and an improvement to the city's parks system. More than 60 years and two additions later, the quaint building at the corner of Kansas Street and Missouri Boulevard is still a place for families. It was named a Landmark in 2010.

Western Steam Bottling Works Building, 610 Jefferson St. — For about its first four decades, this building was the site of a mineral water bottling operation toward the end of the 19th century. It was named a Landmark in 2011.

Landwehr Dairy Farm
Landwehr Dairy Farm, 2024 E. McCarty St.

Landwehr Dairy Farm, 2024 E. McCarty St. — The white, wrap-around porch of the Landwehr Dairy Farm has been featured in many a family photo. For more than 100 years and five generations, the Landwehr family has called the farmhouse home, though the original 300-acre dairy farm has been altered with time, modernization, highways, zoning and residential development. It was named a Landmark in 2011.

East End Fire Station (Old Fire Station 2), 915 E. Miller St. — Perhaps millions of feet of hose have been used in training up and down Jefferson City's first drill tower for fire service. The essential tool for new firefighters was built with the original Fire Station 2. It was named a Landmark in 2012.

Riverview Cemetery, 2600 W. Main St. — Many public servants are memorialized at Riverview Cemetery in Jefferson City. It was named a Landmark in 2012.

Nelson C. and Gertrude A. Burch House, 115 W. Atchison St. — One of the oldest homes remaining in the Old Munichburg neighborhood, the Nelson and Gertrude Burch House was named a Landmark in 2013.

Watts Home, 718 E. Capitol Ave. — The Watts Home is named for Hampton and Cornelia Watts, who had the home built in the early 1920s. It was named a Landmark in 2013.

Stone House, 728 W. Main St. — The unique "cotton rock" limestone of Mid-Missouri was used to construct many of the earliest buildings in Jefferson City. Prussian-born immigrant Bernard Eveler constructed a duplex at the corner of West Main and Clay streets entirely with this uneven medium between 1854-60. It was named a Landmark in 2013.

Eickhoff Home, 1218 Elmerine Ave. — This historic home also was included in the Moreau Drive Historic District, recently added to the National Register of Historic Places. It was named a Landmark in 2014.

Jefferson City News Tribune, 210 Monroe St. — The Jefferson City News Tribune represents more than the heritage of print news in the Capital City; it is the evolution of family traditions. It was named a Landmark in 2014.

Jefferson City Country Club, 516 S. Country Club Drive — With 95 organizers, the Jefferson City Country Club officially formed in September 1909, and Missouri Gov. Herbert Hadley was the first president. It was named a Landmark in 2014.

Broadway School, 230 W. Dunklin St. — Half a century of learning and childhood memories are captured in the Broadway School building at the corner of Broadway and Dunklin streets. It was named a Landmark in 2015.

Hope Mercantile, 201 E. High St. — Hardin Casey initially purchased the lot at the corner of East High and Madison streets for $125 in 1825 to operate the town's first horse-drawn gristmill. It was named a Landmark in 2016.

Farmers Home, 701-703 Jefferson St. — Central in its place, both geographically and socially, the Farmers Home was built at and remains in the commercial center of Old Munichburg. Today, it is the location of ECCO Lounge and a beauty salon. It was named a Landmark in 2016.

The Warden's House, 722 E. Capitol Ave. — Since at least 1925, 722 E. Capitol Ave. had served as the Missouri State Penitentiary deputy warden's home. It was named a Landmark in 2016.

High Street Retreat, 712 E. High St. — Jefferson City's first public funeral home opened about 1929 at this property. Today it is home to High Street Retreat, a vacation-rent-by-owner facility. It was named a Landmark in 2017.

Dix Home, 1919 W. Main St. — Once part of an 80-acre orchard well outside the western city limits, this property remains a standing tribute to the Dix Road namesake. It was named a Landmark in 2017.

Dix Home
Dix Home, 1919 W. Main St.
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