Committee sends another ‘gun rights’ bill to full Senate

Separate bill would make daylight savings time year-round

The committee voting took longer than its hearing on a House-passed bill involving firearms.

“This legislation simply further protects the Second Amendment rights of Missourians,” Rep. Casey Guernsey, R-Bethany, told the Senate’s General Laws Committee in a one-minute, 15-second hearing, “especially as we see the continued assault from the Obama administration, specifically, but also various proposals through Congress.”

The House passed Guernsey’s bill last Wednesday, by a 117-43 vote margin.

Under current law, Missourians must be at least 21 to get a concealed weapons permit, but the proposed law would drop that to 19.

The bill also would make it a Class D felony crime for “any official, agent, or employee of the federal government who enforces or attempts to enforce any act, order, law, statute, rule, or regulation of the federal government created or effective on or after January 1, 2013,” involving personal firearms, firearms accessories, “or ammunition that is owned or manufactured commercially or privately in the state of Missouri and that remains exclusively within the borders of the state of Missouri.”

Under state law, conviction of a Class D felony can result in up to four years imprisonment in a state prison.

The bill also would exempt “private” firearms transactions from the national criminal background check system.

“I don’t think there’s enough we can do to protect our Constitutional rights, whatever they are,” Guernsey told the committee.

No one testified against Guernsey’s bill, and only the Missouri Family Network supported it during the Tuesday afternoon hearing. After hearing several other bills, the committee voted 4-1 to recommend the bill for full Senate debate.

Among the six other bills the committee heard was Rep. Delus Johnson’s proposal to make “daylight saving time” the official, year-round time standard for Missouri.

Johnson, R-St. Joseph, told the committee: “I’ve had several legislators from other states reach out to me on this.

“I’ve had identical legislation introduced in South Carolina (and) Arizona’s legislature is watching this very closely, because they do not change their clocks.”

His proposal would not go into effect unless at least 20 other states adopted the idea, Johnson said.

Johnson and Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, both said they had heard from farmers who wanted the state to have one year-round time.

Schaaf said farmers told him they would prefer standard time. Johnson said he’d heard from farmers preferring the daylight time.

No one testified for, or against, Johnson’s bill.

Daylight Saving Time was designed to have people enjoy sunlight later in the day in the summer months. In Jefferson City, for instance, the latest sunsets are around 8:36 p.m., daylight time, at the end of June.

Switching back to “standard” time in the winter months allows more light in the morning. The “Harris Almanac” said the latest sunrise in December is 7:38 a.m. — also at the end of the month, and carrying into early January. If Johnson’s bill becomes law, that would be 8:38 a.m.

The committee took no action on that bill Tuesday.

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