What do you get when you mix Frisbees and football?

Sean Hogan looks for an open teammate while Tim Wright attempts to block the throw during a game of Ultimate Frisbee down at the North Jefferson City Recreation Area field.

Sean Hogan looks for an open teammate while Tim Wright attempts to block the throw during a game of Ultimate Frisbee down at the North Jefferson City Recreation Area field.

It’s just an informal group of local residents bonded by their love of the fringe sport Ultimate Frisbee, but they eventually hope to get enough interest to form a competitive team.

The name of the Frisbee-meets-football game has been officially shortened to Ultimate due to trademark issues, but players acknowledge that many devotees still call it by the old name.

“Right now, we are just a group of people who play for fun,” participant Logan Nuernberger said in an emailed response to questions.

Tournaments are held across the country, and several are held in different Missouri cities. Just over a week ago, the Show Me State games held an Ultimate tournament at Rock Bridge High School in Columbia, Nuernberger said.

Columbia has several competitive teams, including the University of Missouri MUtants.

The Jefferson City group holds pickup games at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at the North Jefferson City recreation area. The days are subject to change in the future, so keep up with the group through Facebook (Jefferson City Ultimate). The group is looking for players over the age of 18, but anyone is welcome, he said.

The goal of the game is for each team to advance the disc to their opponent’s end zone, much like football. The disc is thrown, but — unlike football — players can’t run with it. Games typically go to 15 points.

As for the rules, each player acts as a line judge/referee. No contact is allowed, and fouls must be called by individual players. If contact is made while competing for a catch — which often happens — the players decide whether a foul occurred.

A turnover of possession occurs when the disc hits the ground, goes out of bounds or is intercepted.

Nuernberger has played since high school, including in Columbia leagues.

“Ultimate is fun for me because of how fast-paced the play is and because it is easy for anyone to pick up and play,” he said. “Also, because each player must act as both quarterback and wide receiver, there is a certain level of difficulty/strategy involved, which always makes the games interesting to watch and play.”

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Please review our Policies and Procedures before registering or commenting

News Tribune - comments