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State Civil War group earns grant to conduct survey on Moore’s Mill site

Reenactors fire their guns during the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Moore's Mill July 28, 2012 at the site of the battle in Calwood. In March, an archeological survey made possible through an American Battlefield Protection Program and organized by the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation and Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritige will search for artifacts of the battle in the largest historical research effort of Callaway's most significant Civil War skirmish.

Reenactors fire their guns during the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Moore's Mill July 28, 2012 at the site of the battle in Calwood. In March, an archeological survey made possible through an American Battlefield Protection Program and organized by the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation and Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritige will search for artifacts of the battle in the largest historical research effort of Callaway's most significant Civil War skirmish.

Missouri’s Civil War Heritage Foundation and it’s local affiliate, Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritage, have announced they will conduct an archeological survey on the core area of the Battle of Moore’s Mill.

The county’s largest and most famous skirmish during the bloody national conflict, the Battle of Moore’s Mill took place July 28, 1862 near where is now known as Calwood. A survey is scheduled to occur there March 21-24.

When Kingdom of Callaway Civil War Heritage co-chair Bryant Liddle became aware of the American Battlefield Protection Program of the National Park Service, an organization which issues grants for surveying and protecting U.S. battle sites, the ball to get the survey underway began rolling.

“It was my recommendation to our local Civil War Heritage that we have somebody apply for this grant, and it went to the Missouri Civil War Heritage,” said Liddle. “They ended up applying for the grant, (and) received it ... That will pay some of the expenses of the people doing the research, some of the transportation and the lodging.”

The survey will be under the supervision of Doug Scott of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Steve Dasovich of Lindenwood University in St. Charles, both of whom have worked on excavations of Civil War and other prominent American battle sites, including the infamous Battle of Little Bighorn.

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