Images of terror attacks etched in young minds

Today’s youth still sorting through what attacks really mean

Fifth-graders from Thorpe Gordon Grade School hang ribbons from trees outside classrooms in September 2001. The entire school made ribbons and wore red, white and blue today to show support for America. Those who were children when the 9/11 attacks took place may have different views of the events than those who were adults. (File photo)

Fifth-graders from Thorpe Gordon Grade School hang ribbons from trees outside classrooms in September 2001. The entire school made ribbons and wore red, white and blue today to show support for America. Those who were children when the 9/11 attacks took place may have different views of the events than those who were adults. (File photo) Photo by News Tribune.

It’s been part of their lives for most of their lives.

Children who were 5, 6, 7 years old on Sept. 11, 2001, have only vague memories of the attack on American soil, and yet the events of that day have made an impact on their lives, whether felt directly or indirectly.

With the surge of patriotism after the attacks came the repeated playing of songs bearing words like “the land of the free, the home of brave.”

At the time, the lyrics “above the fruited plain” confused Patrick Ordway, now a 15-year-old sophomore. “I thought fruit had been thrown at the towers to make them collapse,” Ordway said.

That logic made sense to a 5-year-old.

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Adrienne Luther, now 15, remembers seeing the images of the twin towers on the TV in ....

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