Ceremony marks closing of Walter Reed hospital

WASHINGTON (AP) — Maj. Walter Reed’s sword was symbolically handed over to the Navy at a ceremony Wednesday marking the closure of the Army hospital bearing his name, where hundreds of thousands of the nation’s war wounded have been treated for more than a century.

The tone was somber at times, but mostly celebratory, as more than a thousand former and current staff members and patients — some of them wounded troops from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in wheelchairs who have lost limbs — gathered under a white tent to say goodbye to the Army’s flagship hospital.

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Presidential candidate Richard M. Nixon is visited at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in August 1960 by Vice Presidential candidate Sen. Lyndon Johnson, Senator John Kennedy’s running mate, and Senator Everett Dirksen. Nixon spent two weeks at Walter Reed recovering from a bacterial staph infection.

The Army band played, paratroopers jumped out of a plane, and flags representing various units on the hospital grounds were symbolically cased in black.

The hospital opened in 1909 and has a storied history of care to military members, their families and presidents. President Dwight Eisenhower died there, as did Gens. John J. Pershing and Douglas MacArthur. But in 2007, that reputation was scarred by a scandal about substandard living conditions on its grounds for wounded troops in outpatient care that led to improvements in care for the wounded throughout the military. No mention was made at the ceremony about the scandal.

Instead, the innovation in prosthetics and care to the nation’s war wounded at Walter Reed was honored. Most recently, more than 18,000 troops from the current wars have gone there for treatment.

Army Secretary John McHugh said Walter Reed has never been about bricks and mortar, but about “spirit and hope and compassion” that will continue after the hospital closed.

“These doors may close, the address may change, but the name, the legacy and most importantly the work and the healing will endure,” McHugh said.

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