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story.lead_photo.caption FILE - Director of the National Economic Council Brian Deese speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, Sept. 8, 2021. President Biden’s top economic adviser expressed confidence Sunday, Nov. 14, 2021 that the White House's $1.85 trillion domestic policy package will quickly pass the House this week, saying it couldn’t come at a more urgent time as prices spike higher for consumer goods. “Inflation is high right now. And it is affecting consumers in their pocketbook and also in their outlook for the economy,” said Brian Deese, director of the National Economic Council. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, file)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's top economic adviser expressed confidence Sunday the White House's $1.85 trillion domestic policy package will quickly pass the House this week and said approval couldn't come at a more urgent time as prices of consumer goods spike.

"Inflation is high right now. And it is affecting consumers in their pocketbook and also in their outlook for the economy," said Brian Deese, director of the National Economic Council.

"This, more than anything, will go at the costs that Americans face," he said, before adding that the House will consider the legislation this coming week. "It will get a vote, it will pass."

The House has been moving toward approval of the massive Democrat-only-backed bill even as the measure faces bigger challenges in the Senate, where Sens. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Arizona, have insisted on reducing its size.

In a letter Sunday to Democratic colleagues, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, counseled "time and patience" for working through a bill of this size.

Consumer prices have soared 6.2 percent during the last year, the biggest 12-month jump since 1990. Deese acknowledged prices may not fully return to a more normal 2 percent level until next year due to the lingering effects of COVID-19, but he said the measure will go a long way toward "lowering costs for American families."

"We're confident this bill, as it moves through the process, is going to be fully paid for, and not only that, it's actually going to reduce deficits over the long term," he said.

Biden on Monday planned to sign a related $1 trillion infrastructure bill, a bipartisan effort that was passed earlier this month after the president and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, pledged action on Biden's broader package expanding health, child, elder care and climate change by mid-November.

House progressives had threatened to hold up the infrastructure bill without a firm commitment of immediate action on the broader package.

House centrists say they will vote for the package as early as this week if an upcoming Congressional Budget Office analysis affirms White House estimates that the bill is fully paid for. The measure would be covered with changes to corporate taxes, such as a new corporate minimum tax, while raising taxes on higher- income people.

On Friday, Pelosi wrote Democratic members reaffirming her plan to push ahead soon, noting that CBO estimates released so far on pieces of the plan have been consistent with White House projections.

"We are on a path to be further fortified with numbers from the Congressional Budget Office," she said.

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