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story.lead_photo.caption Televangelist Jim Bakker, right, walks with his wife Lori Beth Graham after a funeral service at the Billy Graham Library for the Rev. Billy Graham, who died at age 99, Friday, March 2, 2018, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Jim Bakker and his southwestern Missouri church will pay restitution of $156,000 to settle a lawsuit that accuses the TV pastor of falsely claiming that a health supplement could cure the coronavirus.

Missouri court records show that a settlement agreement was filed Tuesday. It calls for refunds to people who paid money or gave contributions to obtain a product known as Silver Solution in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The settlement also prohibits Bakker and Morningside Church Productions Inc. from advertising or selling Silver Solution "to diagnose, prevent, mitigate, treat or cure any disease or illness." Bakker, in the agreement, does not admit wrongdoing.

Republican Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt sued Bakker and Morningside in March 2020. Schmitt sought an injunction ordering Bakker to stop selling Silver Solution as a treatment for COVID-19 on his streaming TV program, The Jim Bakker Show. The lawsuit said Bakker and a guest made the cure claim during 11 episodes in February and March of 2020.

Schmitt said in a news release on Wednesday that Bakker has already made restitution to many consumers, and must pay back another $90,000 to others.

The hour-long Jim Bakker Show is filmed in southwestern Missouri. The consent agreement notes that during the program, Silver Solution was offered to those who agreed to contribute $80 to $125.

Bakker's attorney, former Democratic Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, had previously claimed that Bakker was being unfairly targeted "by those who want to crush his ministry and force his Christian television program off the air." Nixon, who served two terms as governor from 2009 to 2017 and is now a partner at the Dowd Bennett law firm in St. Louis, said Bakker did not claim that Silver Solution was a cure for COVID-19.

An email message left Wednesday with Nixon was not immediately returned.

Also in March 2020, U.S. regulators warned Bakker's company and six others to stop selling items using what the government called false claims that they could treat the coronavirus or keep people from catching it. Letters sent jointly by the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission warned the companies that their products for treating COVID-19 were fraudulent, "pose significant risks to patient health and violate federal law."

Nixon said Bakker immediately complied with orders to stop offering Silver Solution on his show and ministry website after receiving the warning letters from the FDA and FTC.

Meanwhile, Arkansas' attorney general filed a lawsuit similar to Missouri's in June 2020. That case is still pending.

 

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