Today's Edition Local Missouri National World Opinion Obits Sports GoMidMo Events Classifieds Newsletters Contests Special Sections Jobs
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
story.lead_photo.caption French-American Mark Moogalian, right, and his wife Isabelle arrive at the Thalys attack trial, at the Paris courthouse, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. The lawyer for an American who was scheduled to testify about his role in the dramatic capture of an Islamic State operative aboard a high-speed train says his witness has been hospitalized after he flew in to Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

PARIS (AP) — When the bare-chested gunman suddenly appeared aboard the speeding Paris-bound train, laden with weapons and his mind allegedly filled with Islamic State group propaganda, passengers at first were stunned.

Then, they sprang into action.

"'You're not going to sit in the corner and die,'" is what British businessman Chris Norman recalls telling himself Aug. 21, 2015, as he steeled himself to act.

"I was terrified when I first saw him coming up the aisle, but then I got angry," the 67-year-old recalled Thursday in an interview with the Associated Press before he testifies at the attack suspect's trial in the French capital.

The thoughts of another passenger who helped thwart the attack on the train that day, French-American citizen Mark Moogalian, weren't for himself but for his wife when he lunged for the gunman's Kalashnikov rifle.

"I was trying to protect Isabelle," Moogalian said, also speaking Thursday before he testified in Paris. "There was no way I was going to let anything happen to her. I was going to do my best."

The recollections at the courthouse from passengers who disarmed the alleged Islamic State operative on the train traveling from Amsterdam highlighted the split-second decisions that foiled what could have become a mass slaughter. The passengers' heroics inspired Clint Eastwood to direct a Hollywood movie re-enacting the dramatic events: "The 15:17 to Paris."

"My first reaction was panic, put yourself in a protective ball and hope nothing happens," Norman said. Then, "I came to the conclusion that really I had to move, I had do something."

The attack suspect, Ayoub El Khazzani, faces a maximum sentence of life in prison if he is convicted of attempted terrorist murder. The 31-year-old Moroccan is being tried with three suspected accomplices.

At the trial's opening earlier this week, defense lawyer Sarah Mauger-Poliak said El Khazzani "regrets having allowed himself to become indoctrinated" by extremist propaganda.

Authorities said El Khazzani boarded the train in Brussels armed with the Kalashnikov, nine clips with 30 rounds each, an automatic pistol and a cutter. Once aboard the train, El Khazzani lingered in a restroom between cars and then emerged bare-chested with his weapons, according to investigators.

Norman told the AP that while other passengers were hitting and trying to choke the gunman, he kept a grip of his right arm and looked into the man's eyes.

"I said to myself, 'What have they done to this guy? What have they done to this guy?' His eyes were completely black. He had eyes devoid of humanity," he said.

"As soon as he started trying to take out his handgun, I took his arm," Norman continued. "There was one thing I didn't want, which was for him to take his gun and use it to escape."

Testifying in court Thursday, one of three Americans who tackled the gunman, Anthony Sadler, said: "It was an intense fight. It was hard to get him under control, even (with) the three of us. And he kept pulling out weapons."

Had they not acted, "He would have shot everyone in our train car" and likely moved on to the next, Sadler added.

Moogalian said the courtroom proceedings are allowing him to piece together the blur of events from that day.

"Everything happened so fast. There was so much confusion," he said.

COMMENTS - It looks like you're using Internet Explorer, which isn't compatible with our commenting system. You can join the discussion by using another browser, like Firefox or Google Chrome.
It looks like you're using Microsoft Edge. Our commenting system is more compatible with Firefox and Google Chrome.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT