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story.lead_photo.caption FILE - In this April 6, 2020 file photo, a customer wearing a mask carries his purchases as he leaves a Target store during the coronavirus pandemic, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Target says it will spend a a total of more than $2 billion at Black-owned businesses by 2025 as part of its effort to advance racial equity. As part of its program, the Minneapolis-based discounter will add products from more than 500 Black-owned businesses across all types of merchandising areas. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will spend a total of more than $2 billion at Black-owned businesses by 2025 as part of its effort to advance racial equity.

That’s a significant increase in overall spending on Black-owned businesses, according to Target, though it declined to be more specific Wednesday.

The Minneapolis retailer will add a broad spectrum of products from more than 500 Black-owned businesses and will increase its spending at more Black-owned companies, from marketing to construction.

It will also introduce new resources, like a dedicated team to help Black-owned suppliers scale their businesses to work with mass chains. The Forward Founders program builds off Target’s accelerator program that helps entrepreneurs.

Target and other corporations have been expanding ties with Black-owned suppliers, rethinking marketing and embracing other initiatives in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd last summer that led to protests nationwide against policy brutality and racial inequity.

The trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, charged in Floyd’s death, continued Wednesday in Minneapolis.

More than 20 companies, including Sephora, Gap and Macy’s, have signed on to a nationwide campaign called 15 Percent Pledge, which aims to have companies commit to at least 15 percent of their products on their shelves to Black-owned businesses — in line with the U.S. Black population. Target’s commitment is unaffiliated with that campaign.

Aurora James, founder and creative director of Brother Vellies, started 15 Percent Pledge as a nonprofit advocacy group last year. She said in an interview with the Associated Press this week that the biggest problem for Black-opened businesses is lack of access. James said her group is building a data base of Black-owned businesses that helps retailers and brands connect with Black entrepreneurs.

Kendra Bracken-Ferguson is a Black digital marketing and brand development specialist in beauty and wellness. She has experience first-hand pitching Black-owned brands to Target and other stores. She believes the spending commitment at Target will make a difference.

“Ultimately, Target is creating the pipeline that will fundamentally change how retailers must handle new brands coming into their stores,” Bracken-Ferguson said.

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