Calvary Lutheran students explore world through culture fair

Julie Smith/News Tribune photo: 
Freshman Trevor Kibbee, left, takes a small bite of an empanada at Roberto Weber's table of food from Argentina Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2024, during a culture fair at Calvary Lutheran High School. Fellow freshman Katie Wachter, center, had already tried one and had sampled the dessert spread as well. Looking on is Calvary math instructor Carrie Whittle.
Julie Smith/News Tribune photo: Freshman Trevor Kibbee, left, takes a small bite of an empanada at Roberto Weber's table of food from Argentina Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2024, during a culture fair at Calvary Lutheran High School. Fellow freshman Katie Wachter, center, had already tried one and had sampled the dessert spread as well. Looking on is Calvary math instructor Carrie Whittle.

A faith-based Jefferson City school's culture fair was bigger this year than last.

And better.

Students at Calvary Lutheran High School got a larger view of the world's cultures Wednesday as the school hosted its second Culture Fair, which was about twice the size of last year's.

One reason for the increased size of the fair was the participation of students and staff from Lincoln University. Lincoln staffed tables on the Bahamas, Jamaica, Nigeria, Ghana, Germany and Colombia.

Presenters -- including students and members of the community -- shared snacks, clothing, and other items from their countries. The German table handed out bratwurst and cups of sauerkraut.

Calvary Lutheran student Abby Gonzalez served homemade flan at the Honduras table. Gonzalez, who has Honduran family on her mother's side, said she has visited the country twice, once in fourth grade and once as a freshman.

Some different things Gonzalez noted during her time in Honduras were that gas stations were not self-serve and schools don't have their own school buses, only public transportation.

Gonzalez said poverty is high in Honduras. There are also many open air markets, and a savvy buyer will often haggle for goods.

Daniel Agyare, who presented at the Ghana table, came from Ghana to Lincoln University to study sustainable agriculture.

Ghana's climate is similar to the climate in Missouri, he said. Ghana has more sunshine throughout the year, but doesn't register such high temperatures. And while Missouri has four seasons, Ghana mainly has two -- the rainy season and the dry season.

Agyare said Ghana was the first African nation to gain independence. Although the official language is English, the country boasts more than 700 languages, including many tribal languages. It is a major exporter of gold and cocoa -- Agyare had some chocolate for people to try -- and is home to Lake Volta, the world's artificial reservoir.

Ghana has three branches of government: executive, judicial and parliamentary. But it also has traditional governance by chiefs that maintains cultural and moral norms, he said.

Ajiri Oboreh-Snapps, a Lincoln nursing student, presented information about Nigeria. Nigeria, too, is home to hundreds of languages, as well as three main tribes.

Calvary students went from table to table with their cross-cultural celebration "bingo." Each square had a different challenge for each table, such as figuring out the average income in Italy or learning how to say "good morning" or "happy birthday" in India.

  photo  Juliie Smith/News Tribune photo: Amos Barnabas, right, shows off traditional Indian clothing while talking to students who visited his table Wednesday at Calvary Lutheran High School, which hosted a culture fair in the gymnasium. Barnabas, who hails from India, was a student at the high school and was invited back to demonstrate native food and talk about his home country. Next to Barnabas is CalvaryS junior Jaden Sutcliffe, who aasisted Barnabas at the fair.
 
 
  photo  Julie Smith/News Tribune photo: Amos Barnabas, right, answers questions about his home country of India on Wednesday during a culture fair at Calvary Lutheran High School. Barnabas attended the school a few years ago as an exchange student. At left is Calvary junior Landon Marion, who had plenty of questions about India and other countries represented at tables set up in the school's gymnasium. In the background is Barnabas' assistant for the event, Calvary junior Jordan Sutcliffe.
 
 
  photo  Julie Smith/News Tribune photo: Lauren Schubert, left, learns about British currency, traditions, but most importantly, cookies, while visiting Abigail Ward's table about Great Britain during Wednesday's culture fair at Calvary Lutheran High School. Schubert, a junior, was really interested in the coins that Ward, an English and religion teacher, had brought for her display. At right is Jonathan Morris, who assisted Ward.
 
 

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