shelly75ngml

shelly75ngml 1 year, 2 months ago on Our Opinion: Should government climb in the tanning bed?

This should absolutely be the parent's decision and the government has no place in it. As the mother of a son with terrible acne, I have found that tanning beds are a efficient and affordable way to help my son's skin clear up. The assumption that the only reason a youth would want to use a tanning bed is to get a tan is flat out wrong. There are plenty of other reasons, such as my son's, there are other skin conditions that can be helped with UV exposure such as psoriasis, and eczema. If a family is about to go on a vacation to a sunny location they may chose to visit a salon to acquire a base tan to minimize the risk of sunburn. Let's be clear, SUNBURN is the factor that increases the risk of skin cancer, not a tan. If the option of tanning in a salon is taken away from anyone, they may seek out other means like home units and spending extended periods of time outdoors. A salon offers a controlled environment of UV exposure to avoid burns, they take into consideration a person's skin type and limit the amount of time a person is in a tanning bed based on science. You do not get that safety precaution through a home unit or outdoors. I feel that limiting access to a salon would have the opposite affect that what is sought by these laws that are being proposed. As for the person that commented before me about tanning beds being "15 times hotter than the sun" you need to do some research. Tanning beds are only 2 to 3 times more concentrated UV. They are designed that way to get tanned in a fraction of the time it would take under the sun. As I said before, a salon limits the time you spend in a bed based on your skin type and equipment being used and the formula is meant to give a client 2/3 the time it would take to induce a sunburn, therefore safely being below dangerous levels of UV exposure. Not to mention the fairest skin type person (skin type 1) are not allowed to tan in a salon because there is too much risk for burning. Salons adhere to safe and responsible practices and should be acknowledged for that instead of wrongly blamed for skin cancer.

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shelly75ngml 1 year, 2 months ago on shelly75ngml

This should absolutely be the parent's decision and the government has no place in it. As the mother of a son with terrible acne, I have found that tanning beds are a efficient and affordable way to help my son's skin clear up. The assumption that the only reason a youth would want to use a tanning bed is to get a tan is flat out wrong. There are plenty of other reasons, such as my son's, there are other skin conditions that can be helped with UV exposure such as psoriasis, and eczema. If a family is about to go on a vacation to a sunny location they may chose to visit a salon to acquire a base tan to minimize the risk of sunburn. Let's be clear, SUNBURN is the factor that increases the risk of skin cancer, not a tan. If the option of tanning in a salon is taken away from anyone, they may seek out other means like home units and spending extended periods of time outdoors. A salon offers a controlled environment of UV exposure to avoid burns, they take into consideration a person's skin type and limit the amount of time a person is in a tanning bed based on science. You do not get that safety precaution through a home unit or outdoors. I feel that limiting access to a salon would have the opposite affect that what is sought by these laws that are being proposed. As for the person that commented before me about tanning beds being "15 times hotter than the sun" you need to do some research. Tanning beds are only 2 to 3 times more concentrated UV. They are designed that way to get tanned in a fraction of the time it would take under the sun. As I said before, a salon limits the time you spend in a bed based on your skin type and equipment being used and the formula is meant to give a client 2/3 the time it would take to induce a sunburn, therefore safely being below dangerous levels of UV exposure. Not to mention the fairest skin type person (skin type 1) are not allowed to tan in a salon because there is too much risk for burning. Salons adhere to safe and responsible practices and should be acknowledged for that instead of wrongly blamed for skin cancer.

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