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JCneeds2HS

JCneeds2HS 1 year, 9 months ago on Educator: Academies target ‘relevancy piece’

Bentonville School Article Click on the link below to view the Video nwahomepage.com/fulltext-news?nxd_id=278167 Parents React to Bentonville School Board Decision By: Nina Criscuolo Updated: October 18, 2011 The Bentonville School Board has decided not to build a second high school. Now parents in the district are speaking out. Currently more than 36-hundred kids pack the Bentonville High School. By 2020 that number is expected rise above five-thousand students. To ease the crowding the school board voted to build a ninth grade center. Bentonville voters will have the last say on this issue and right now some are not happy with the option the school board is putting on the ballot. Of the folks who spoke before the board Monday night, the majority wanted a second high school and worry a ninth grade center is only a band-aid fix. "Past time for two high school definitely," says Kisheen Miller. "I just feel like a ninth grade center is a short-term solution to a long-term problem," says Wendi Cheatham. "It's not a ninth grade academy, it's an expanded high school. It's going to be a 53-hundred student population high school." "They're disappointed immensely." says board member Travis Riggs. "They were disappointed we didn't do it last time, so now a second time we've said no." He spear-headed the argument for a second high school. "We told the community when we voted on this last time, we would come back and give you the question of a second high school and basically we didn't do that," says Riggs. He and Willie Cowgur were out-number by the five other board members, lead by Bryan Vernetti, who says he wanted a ninth grade center for economic reasons. "We're going to try to do the best job we can taking into account, not only the quality of education, but also the impact that the school system has on the tax payers budgets," says Vernetti. Tuesday, parents who agree with the decision seem to be the minority. "I was hoping they would go that way, so I'm happy," says Cherlyn Jenson. Meaning the school district may have a big hurdle getting voters to back their choice. "I think it's going to take a lot of convincing from the school board and the people who do want a ninth grade center to change my mind and other people's minds that the ninth grade center's the way to go,' says mother Deanna Moser. "Boy, I don't know. We'll see how it goes," says Riggs. The ninth grade center would cost tax payers about 60-million dollars, which breaks down to about 150-dollars in property taxes for someone with a 200-thousand dollar house. Bentonville folks will head to the polls this spring. A group of parents at the Monday meeting say they will form an opposition to the millage vote for a ninth grade center.

jcneeds2hs.com/uploads/Parents_React_to_Bentonville_School_Board_Decision_FB_1.pdf

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JCneeds2HS 1 year, 9 months ago on High school ballot issues define board race

On April 2nd, the ballot instructions say you can select 2 of the 3 Candidate's. To increase the likelihood that your best candidate is elected select one and only one Harold Coots.

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JCneeds2HS 1 year, 12 months ago on Plan for new high school called ‘sound’

Small School Law – Florida Florida law as of July 2003 (c) A high school with a student population of not more than 900 students

.ilsr.org/rule/small-schools-vs-big-schools/2107-2/

Small School Law – Florida

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at .ilsr.org/rule/small-schools-vs-big-schools/2107-2/

In 2000, the Florida legislature passed the statute shown below, that recognizes the benefits of small schools and prohibits, as of July 2003, the construction of large schools. As of that date, new elementary schools will be limited to 500 students, middle schools to 700, and high schools to 900.


Florida Statutes: Title XVI Education – Chapter 235 Educational Facilities 235.2157 Small school requirement.– (1) LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS.–The Legislature finds that: (a) Florida’s schools are among the largest in the nation. (b) Smaller schools provide benefits of reduced discipline problems and crime, reduced truancy and gang participation, reduced dropout rates, improved teacher and student attitudes, improved student self-perception, student academic achievement equal to or superior to that of students at larger schools, and increased parental involvement. (c) Smaller schools can provide these benefits while not increasing administrative and construction costs. (2) DEFINITION.–As used in this section, “small school” means: (a) An elementary school with a student population of not more than 500 students. (b) A middle school with a student population of not more than 700 students. (c) A high school with a student population of not more than 900 students. (d) A school serving kindergarten through grade 8 with a student population of not more than 700 students. (e) A school serving kindergarten through grade 12 with a student population of not more than 900 students. Aschool on a single campus which operates as a school-within-a-school, as defined by s. 230.23(20), shall be considered a small school if each smaller unit located on the single campus meets the requirements of this subsection. (3) REQUIREMENTS.– (a) Beginning July 1, 2003, all plans for new educational facilities to be constructed within a school district and reflected in the 5-year school district facilities work plan shall be plans for small schools in order to promote increased learning and more effective use of school facilities. (b) Small schools shall comply with all laws, rules, and court orders relating to racial balance. (4)EXCEPTIONS.–This section does not apply to plans for new educational facilities already under architectural contract on July 1, 2003. History.–s. 21, ch. 2000-235.

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JCneeds2HS 2 years ago on Our Opinion: Keep focus on key issues for secondary education

JC is No. 1 in school size newstribune.com/news/2012/oct/21/jc-plan-no-1-school-size/

If all Jefferson City high school students were combined on one campus, it would be the largest high school in the state, home to about 2,670 students. That’s what the Jefferson City Board of Education is proposing to do with its plan to build a single, replacement high... school on the land it purchased three weeks ago east of Missouri 179. But by breaking up that campus into smaller learning communities, called academies, the board hopes to address the community’s concerns about such a large high school. Currently, the largest high school in the state is Hazelwood West High with 2,258 students, based on 2012 enrollment data provided by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Two other high schools in the St. Louis region — Marquette Senior High in Chesterfield and Northwest High in Cedar Hill — follow closely with 2,201 students and 2,120 students, respectively. Jefferson City is ranked 11th on that list with 1,957 students grades 10 through 12. But there’s a caveat: The 711 students currently enrolled at Simonsen 9th Grade Center are not counted in that number. For the other 10 big schools, their ninth grade classes are included in their high school population totals. Which means, by some measures, Jefferson City may already be operating the largest high school in the state. And if the district chooses to build a single new high school that houses all four grades to replace the current campus at 609 Union St., the likelihood is quite high that facility will be the largest in the state — by 410 students. In other words, Jefferson City High School would be 18 percent larger than Hazelwood West, when the ninth grade is combined with upperclassmen. Columbia Public Schools had 5,128 students enrolled in grades 9-12 a year ago, and is in the process of building a new school. Once it is inhabited, the district expects to distribute the students like this: 1,963 at Rock Bridge; 1,987 at Hickman; 1,062 at Battle; and 93 at Douglas. The size of the student population in the Jefferson City School District — foreshadowed by a current baby boom in the lower grades — has recently re-energized the debate about how students ought to be educated, and in what setting. What about a second high school?

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JCneeds2HS 2 years ago on 2 schools of thought

Enrollment statements in the news?

By Bob Watson. newstribune.com/news/2011/jan/24/building-bond-issue-may-loom-jefferson-city-school/ Monday, January 24, 2011.

Superintendent Brian Mitchell said, the district must make some decisions about buildings, even if a consultant’s predictions of adding from 500-3,000 more students over 10 years are too optimistic. JC Schools Review Expansion Plan Dec 5, 2011 9:41 PM abc17news.com/news.php?id=4497 Mitchell says the existing building can't keep up with what the district wants to do and the steady, slight increases it expects in student population over the next five and ten years. JCPS Discusses Enrollment Oct 9, 2012 7:32 PM abc17news.com/news.php?id=7832 Increasing student enrollment is one of the main reasons for the new high school proposal. School officials have adjusted their original figure of more than 300 new students to just about 250 this school year. Most of the growth is happening in kindergarten through third grade, which means the district is only going to keep growing. Superintendent Brian Mitchell also showed a timeline of the major growth spurts in the district over the last 50 years. District leaders expect to gain a couple hundred new students every year moving forward. Jefferson City School Board Discusses New School Plans Posted: Oct 9, 2012 7:05 PM by Amy Fenton Updated: Oct 9, 2012 7:40 PM komu.com/news/jefferson-city-school-board-discusses-new-school-plans/ At the board meeting, Luther presented the results of the survey and said it is far from what they wanted. He found residents who are not associated with the school do not understand the new program. "We have a lot of work to do. It is not surprising that parents of student are more informed, but we need to inform the other residents as well," said Luther. Once the community understands the program better, the school board members will apply for a bond to start building the school, and will sell the old buildings. The total cost of the new school will be about $70 million, Luther estimates. The school board hopes to have the new school done by 2014. Two Public High Schools Not Likely, Jefferson City District Says Posted: Nov 16, 2012 7:22 PM by Danny Spewak Updated: Nov 16, 2012 11:19 PM komu.com/news/two-public-high-schools-not-likely-jefferson-city-district-says/ But Luther said that 2011 survey isn't necessarily a barometer of public interest. "You can look at that, but it's two years old now," Luther said. In 2012, Jefferson City Public Schools conducted another survey, but this time, it did not ask respondents whether they preferred one or two high schools. Instead, it focused questions more about the structure of the proposed academy system. "I have to be frank, that question [about two high schools] wasn't really part of this second survey because the board felt they were satisfied with the single high school option," Luther said. "They felt that was the right direction to go."

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JCneeds2HS 2 years ago on Lincoln, Linn Tech agree to buy Jefferson City High School complex

"The school board continues to move forward with a plan that is not supported by the community. Based on their own telephone survey results the voting public told them, and I quote:

"When presented with three different options at the high school level - and being told they were free to like one, two, all three or none of them - respondents expressed strong support for a second high school (73% saying they would "Strongly favor" or "Favor" it), followed by the option for on-campus academies at the current high school (52%), and academies at various locations (45%)."

But they refuse to listen to the voters and continue to push the Mitchell Plan that wasn't even recommended by his own Secondary School Study Committee.

This arrogance and "we know better than Jefferson City Community" attitude is disturbing.

We plan to brief our concerns with the Mitchell Plan at the Dec 10 School Board meeting.

LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HAS CHANGED TO (Dix Education Center, 204 Dix Road)

Monday Dec. 10, 2012 6pm. Dix Education Center, 204 Dix Road

WE REQUEST YOUR ATTENDANCE AS A SIGN OF SUPPORT

Citizens for 2 Public High Schools: We disagree with the school board’s proposal for 1 large high school for our district.

Web Page: jcneeds2hs.com
Contact us at: info@jcneeds2hs.com Contact Dan: jcpsnotforsale@hotmail.com
Facebook page: facebook.com/jcschooltax Paid for by Citizens for Two Public High Schools, Dan Ortmeyer, Treasurer

JCPS_Secondary_Schools_Study_Committee_3_options

LINK To: Secondary Schools Study Committee options jcneeds2hs.com/uploads/Secondary_Schools_Study_Committee_3_options_A_B_C_4_4_2011_2b.pdf

JCPS 2011 telephone survey

In May 2011, a 10- to 12-minute telephone survey was conducted with 400 randomly selected, head-of-household, registered voter patrons of the Jefferson City Public Schools to learn their views on a variety of topics related to plans being considered for the school district.

jeffcity.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com/news/documents/2012/10/10/JCPS_2011_study_1.pdf

JCPS 2012 telephone survey

In late August and September 2012, a 10- to 12-minute telephone survey was conducted with 400 randomly selected, head-of-household, registered voter, heads of households, divided based on elementary school drawing areas to match the general population pattern in Jefferson City Public Schools. The survey was designed to show voters' views on a variety of topics related to plans being considered for the school district.

jeffcity.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com/news/documents/2012/10/10/JCPS_2012_survey.pdf

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JCneeds2HS 2 years ago on Lincoln, Linn Tech agree to buy Jefferson City High School complex

LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HAS CHANGED TO (Dix Education Center, 204 Dix Road)

ATTENTION Citizens of the Jefferson City School District

The Leaders of the Citizens for 2 Public High Schools are on the School Board Meeting Agenda. Monday Dec. 10, 2012 6pm. Dix Education Center, 204 Dix Road WE REQUEST YOUR ATTENDANCE AS A SIGN OF SUPPORT

Rod Burnett and Dan Ortmeyer will be addressing the school board in opposition to the proposal for 1 large high school for our district. Citizens for 2 Public High Schools: We disagree with the school board’s proposal for 1 large high school for our district.

Web Page: jcneeds2hs.com
Contact us at: info@jcneeds2hs.com
Facebook page: facebook.com/jcschooltax Contact Dan: jcpsnotforsale@hotmail.com Paid for by Citizens for Two Public High Schools, Dan Ortmeyer, Treasurer

LINK TO MAP: jcneeds2hs.com/uploads/204_dix_road_photo_2_crop_150_PDF.pdf

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JCneeds2HS 2 years ago on Lincoln, Linn Tech agree to buy Jefferson City High School complex

We are already operating two schools, Simonsen 9th grade ,711 students, JC grades 10, 11, 12, 1,957 students totaling 2670.

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