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Ferguson spurs 40 new state measures; activists want more

When a white Ferguson policeman fatally shot a black 18-year-old nearly a year ago, the St. Louis suburb erupted in violent protests and the nation took notice. Since then, legislators in almost every state have proposed changes to the way police interact with the public.

Ferguson spurs 40 new laws across country

When a white Ferguson policeman fatally shot a black 18-year-old nearly a year ago, the St. Louis suburb erupted in violent protests and the nation took notice. Since then, legislators in almost every state have proposed changes to the way police interact with the public.

State parties broke, fundraising less important

Missouri’s political parties are in debt with just about a year left before the 2016 primary elections and must essentially start from scratch in terms of fundraising, recent state campaign finance reports show.

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No FBI cold-case inquiry for missing civil rights pioneer

Descendants of a man who vanished after winning a historic legal fight to become the first black student at the University of Missouri's law school had hoped an FBI cold-case initiative focusing on possible racially motivated deaths from the civil rights era would unearth clues about his disappearance.

Elaine Langford — July State Employee of the Month

Teacher makes love of reading contagious

For boys at the Girardot Center in Cape Girardeau, being a part of Elaine Langford’s Book Club is an honor, said special-education teacher Sharon Moroni, who nominated Langford as State Employee of the Month.

University of Missouri discounts some online tuition costs

The University of Missouri says it will give a 10 percent tuition discount to Missouri students enrolled in a full degree program online.

Businesses ready to take advantage of clean-energy district

A number of projects will be in the works soon as Cape Girardeau businesses take advantage of the city's involvement in a new, clean-energy district.

Program helps draw wildlife to land under power lines

On a recent morning, a plot of land underneath the power lines crossing Rhea Ross' property was bursting with buckwheat. Bees and butterflies are attracted to the plant, and deer eat it as well, she said.

Missouri State, Mercy Springfield to operate clinic

Missouri State University and Mercy Springfield have agreed to jointly operate a primary care clinic for the uninsured.

State political parties broke, fundraising less important

Missouri's political parties are in debt with just about a year left before the 2016 primary elections and must essentially start from scratch in terms of fundraising, recent state campaign finance reports show.

Woman sues credit reporting firms for declaring her dead

A 40-year-old St. Louis woman isn't dead, but she said she spent months trying to convince credit reporting agencies that she's alive.

Democrat Hensley enters Missouri attorney general's race

Former Cass County prosecutor Teresa Hensley says she's seeking the Democratic nomination for Missouri attorney general, which had briefly become a one-candidate race when Scott Sifton dropped out to seek re-election to the state Senate.

Federal report finds bias in St. Louis County family court

The U.S. Department of Justice released a report critical of the St. Louis County Family Court on Friday, finding black youths are treated more harshly than whites, and juveniles are often deprived of constitutional rights.

Group wants KC ballot measure seeking $15 an hour minimum wage

A Kansas City coalition of civil rights and social justice organizations says the city's plan to raise the minimum wage to $13 an hour by 2020 doesn't go far enough and is demanding a November vote on pushing it to $15.

23 years after Iowa student's death, mom hopes for answers

The mother of a Grinnell College student slain nearly 23 years ago says she's trying to remain optimistic that investigators will solve the case.

University City weighs contracting for ambulance service

A suburban St. Louis town is considering turning its ambulance service over to a private contractor.

TriWest Healthcare plans to hire 500 people in Kansas City

An Arizona-based health care services company for the military plans to open a service center in Kansas City and hire 500 employees.

Texas company asks Missouri to rethink power line rejection

A Houston-based company is asking Missouri utility regulators to reconsider their rejection of a proposed high-voltage power line that was planned for a multistate wind energy project.

Woman accused in antifreeze deaths wants statements tossed

Attorneys for a southwestern Missouri woman accused of fatally poisoning her husband and a son with antifreeze are asking a judge to toss out her videotaped statements to investigators.

I-70 lanes in St. Louis open again after water main break

The eastbound lanes of Interstate 70 in St. Louis have reopened after closure for about an hour when a water main break flooded the pavement.

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