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Review: Sixpence shows little growth on new album

Review: Sixpence shows little growth on new album

Sixpence None the Richer, "Lost in Transition" (Tyger Jim Records)

August 7th, 2012 by RON HARRIS, Associated Press in News

Matt Slocum, co-founder and guitarist of Sixpence None the Richer, says the group has fully changed since they broke up in 2004 and reunited three years after. But that doesn't reveal itself as a metamorphosis in the songs on their new album, "Lost in Transition."

After the split, Sixpence released an EP and a Christmas album, but they officially return with their first full-length album, delivering a familiar sound while not daring to break into any new territory.

The album opener, "My Dear Machine," is a decent track, with some fine and fuzzy guitar work highlighted by lead singer Leigh Nash's smooth and strong voice. Unfortunately, the song gets overpowered by horns near the end.

After this somewhat strong start, the Nashville, Tenn.-based band runs into an inevitable truth for most '90s-era bands looking for a renaissance. Hits are hard. And their yesteryear radio staples like "Kiss Me" and "There She Goes" are tough to replicate for the listener's sweet spot. New tracks like "Failure" and "Give It Back" are musically passable, but are ultimately wordy misfires that tell us nothing of the transformative time that is allegedly the underpinning of this album.

CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: Sixpence does well to slow things down on "Safety Line," the most heartfelt song on the album.