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Styx singer Dennis DeYoung to headline Concert Inside the Walls

Styx singer Dennis DeYoung to headline Concert Inside the Walls

March 18th, 2019 by Nicole Roberts in Local News

Styx lead singer and founding member Dennis DeYoung will headline the fourth annual Salute to America's Concert Inside the Walls on June 1, 2019, in Jefferson City.

Get ready to rock 'n' roll this June as Styx lead singer and founding member Dennis DeYoung will headline the fourth annual Salute to America's Concert Inside the Walls, festival organizers announced Monday.

Presented by the Missouri Lottery, this year's Concert Inside the Walls at the historic Missouri State Penitentiary will be at 5:30 p.m. June 1 and feature Dennis DeYoung and the Music of Styx.

Tickets range in price from $30-$125, according to the festival's website. Tickets can be purchased online at concertinsidethewalls.com or etix.com

American rock band Styx formed in 1972 and became famous in the late 1970s and early 1980s. They are known for songs including "Come Sail Away," "Babe" and "Mr. Roboto."

"We all grew up with the music of Styx, and they have songs that we all know and love," said Jefferson City Mayor Carrie Tergin. "'80s rock and some of the classic rock is in and popular, so we're bringing a little bit of that to the prison."

In past years, Concert Inside the Walls has featured country artists Big & Rich, Wynonna Jude & The Big Noise, and Travis Tritt.

"We're changing it up and we're bringing some rock to the prison this year — we're going to rock the prison — so we thought it would be fun," Tergin said. "People said, 'Let's do something different. We've really enjoyed the last three years; they've been a lot of fun, but let's try to change it up a little bit,' so we listened to what people wanted."

To watch a concert inside an old, decommissioned prison is "very unique" and "something you can't do every day," Tergin added.

Festival organizers have previously tied the concert more closely with the city's Fourth of July festivities, but moving the concert up a month might allow for more favorable weather, Tergin said.