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Jefferson City voters approve 3 charter amendments

Jefferson City voters approve 3 charter amendments

April 3rd, 2019 by Nicole Roberts in Local News

Kristy Schriefer casts her vote at Calvary Baptist Church in Jefferson City on Tuesday, April 2, 2019.

Photo by Mark Wilson /News Tribune.

Jefferson City voters approved three city charter amendments in Tuesday's election.

With 4,858 votes, voters approved Proposition B with 2,814 votes (57.93 percent) in favor of the proposition and 2,044 votes (42.07 percent) against, according to the unofficial results.

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Proposition B allows the Jefferson City mayor to serve two consecutive full terms instead of absolute eight-year terms, while Jefferson City Council members can serve four consecutive full terms instead of absolute eight-year terms.

After a mayor serves two full terms, he or she must wait a four-year mayoral term before serving as mayor again. City Council members must take a two-year break after completing four consecutive full terms before serving on the council again.

With 4,767 votes, Cole County voters approved Proposition C with 3,822 votes (80.18 percent) in favor of the proposition and 954 votes (19.82 percent) against, according to the unofficial results.

Under Proposition C, the City Council can remove the city prosecutor if the council has a four-fifths vote. The council could remove the city prosecutor if he or she lacks the qualifications, violates the charter, neglects the office, or is convicted of felonies or misdemeanors involving moral turpitude.

With 4,680 votes, Cole County voters approved Proposition D, with 3,479 votes (74.34 percent) in favor of it and 1,201 votes (25.66 percent) against it, according to the unofficial results.

Proposition D prohibits the mayor, city administrator, city clerk, department directors and members of the Jefferson City Parks and Recreation Commission from being publicly elected members of a state political subdivision or the Missouri General Assembly. It also prevents them from holding a statewide elected office while serving in their city positions.

The exception is if the city officials are serving in the public offices in their capacity as city officials.

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