MSP tours to resume April 21

This file photo from March 21, 2012, shows repairs being made on the front of Housing Unit 1 at the Missouri State Penitentiary along Layfette Street in Jefferson City. State officials closed off the vacant prison last month and canceled public tours for the rest of 2013 due to mold problems in the historic site's deteriorating buildings.

This file photo from March 21, 2012, shows repairs being made on the front of Housing Unit 1 at the Missouri State Penitentiary along Layfette Street in Jefferson City. State officials closed off the vacant prison last month and canceled public tours for the rest of 2013 due to mold problems in the historic site's deteriorating buildings. Photo by News Tribune.

Though work is ongoing, tours of the old Missouri State Penitentiary will resume April 21.

The Jefferson City Convention and Visitors Bureau, or CVB, announced Thursday morning that “modified tours” are expected to begin April 21. The modified history tours will allow access to Housing Units 1 and 4, and the gas chamber, while the state continues mold remediation and repair work. The release states all remediation is expected to be complete by late June and full tours would begin July 1.

“Ongoing construction and repair work will not interfere with public tours,” the release states.

At the end of September, the CVB temporarily suspended all tours of the historic prison site, only to later announce the cancellation of all 2013 tours because of mold found at the site.

Late last year, the city agreed to split with the state the estimated $2 million cost of repairs and mold remediation at MSP , in exchange for a long-term contract with the CVB for use of the facility. The $2 million has provided for cleanup of hazardous material, window repairs and window closures in Housing Units 1, 3, 4 and the gas chamber, and roof replacements in each unit.

“The Missouri State Penitentiary holds 178 years of history within its walls,” said Office of Administration Commissioner Doug Nelson. “By preserving this iconic structure, the State of Missouri and City of Jefferson have ensured that generations of visitors can continue to safely experience this historic Missouri landmark for many years to come.”

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