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Hanks, Redford, 'Butler' among Oscar snubs

Actor Chris Hemsworth, left, and President of the Academy Cheryl Boone Isaacs announce the Academy Awards nominations for Best Director at the 86th Academy Awards nomination ceremony on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 in Beverly Hills, Calif. The 86th Annual Academy Awards will take place on Sunday, March 2, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Actor Chris Hemsworth, left, and President of the Academy Cheryl Boone Isaacs announce the Academy Awards nominations for Best Director at the 86th Academy Awards nomination ceremony on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 in Beverly Hills, Calif. The 86th Annual Academy Awards will take place on Sunday, March 2, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Photo by The Associated Press.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In this year's Oscar nominations, entries didn't sway far from what was expected, though there were a few shocking additions — five-time Razzie nominee "Lone Ranger"! — and plenty of overlooked titles.

Here's a breakdown of the snubs and surprises at the 86th Oscar nominations:

SNUBS:

— "Captain Phillips." Tom Hanks is widely beloved by the academy, having been nominated five times previously, and winning for "Forest Gump" and "Philadelphia." But even though "Captain Phillips," in which Hanks plays the title role, was nominated six times, Hanks was denied an actor nod for his lead performance.

— "All Is Lost." Robert Redford, expected by many to be nominated for his solo roll in the shipwreck drama, also missed out on a best actor nod, which he's never won.

— "Lee Daniels' the Butler." If the lack of Golden Globe nominations was any indication, it's no surprise this film was given little love by the academy. But a complete shutout is a shock. At least Oprah still has a chance to take home a trophy for her performance as Gloria Gaines at the Screen Actors Guild Awards this weekend.

— "Blue Jasmine." Though the film received three nominations, including a best actress bid for Cate Blanchett, best supporting actress for Sally Hawkins, and original screenplay, writer-director Woody Allen was left out of the directing category. Though he may take home the trophy for writing, perhaps it's best to let the gals be the belles of the Oscar ball. It's not like Allen, who hates award shows, would show up anyway.

— "Her." Spike Jonze was also left out of the directing category for his work on this futuristic love story. But his film earned noms in four other categories, including original score, original song, best picture, production design and original screenplay. Last nominated in 1999 for best director for "Being John Malkovich," Jonze has yet to win an Academy Award. Also from "Her," Joaquin Phoenix was denied a best actor nomination for his lead role in the futuristic love story. It's a surprising snub after the actor carried the film on only the sound of Scarlett Johansson's voice.

— "Inside Llewyn Davis." After receiving a flurry of praise, including sweeping the National Society of Film Critics' top prizes for picture, director, actor (Oscar Isaac) and cinematography, this folk-music tale was nominated for only two Oscars — cinematography and sound mixing. Directors Ethan and Joel Coen were left out of the directing category and the film's star, Isaac, was also denied.

— "Saving Mr. Banks." Disney's making of "Mary Poppins" tale failed to gain either a best picture nomination or a best actress nod for lead Emma Thompson. But it did earn one nom for original score.

— "Fruitvale Station." Perhaps it was far-fetched to think this numbing injustice tale would edge its way into at least the best original screenplay category, but the snub of young filmmaker Ryan Coogler's debut is disappointing. After all, the Academy occasionally carries a soft spot for the gritty newcomer (Diablo Cody gained a trophy for "Juno" in 2007). Alas, the competition was just too steep this year.

— "Monsters University." Notably absent from the animated feature film category was this Disney and Pixar kiddie flick, which was voiced by Billy Crystal, John Goodman and Helen Mirren, and ranked in the top 10 for domestic box office ticket sales in 2013. But Disney's "Frozen" and "The Wind Rises" earned nods, so two out of five ain't bad. Fox's "The Croods," Universal's "Despicable Me 2" and the GKIDS film "Ernest & Celestine" were also nominated.

— "The Hunger Games." Though an unlikely nominee in top categories, this sci-fi adventure, which ranked No. 3 at the box office in 2013 earning $414.4 million domestically, was denied attention from the academy. All of the Alexander McQueen styling, and that sassy makeup, could have at least garnered costume design or makeup and hairstyling bids.

SURPRISES:

— "Philomena." Starring Judi Dench, the film, which only made $22 million domestically, brought home a surprising four nominations. But critics loved it — and rightfully so. Dench, who gained a best actress nomination for her role as a woman in search of her son, was a tender and charming triumph.

— "The Lone Ranger." Sure this Western stars the ever-dynamic Johnny Depp, but this summer extravaganza was about as impressive as Depp's widely panned "The Tourist." Still it nabbed TWO noms for makeup-hairstyling and visual effects. Depp can make just about anything look good, but to echo Amy Poehler and Seth Meyers on "SNL," ''Really?!'"

— "Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa." Johnny Knoxville's candid-camera hit, where he dresses up like an old man and pranks people, managed to earn a nomination in the makeup and hairstyling category — and over $101.7 million at the box office.

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