Kids work against hunger

Abigail Witcher, 13, Billie McClain, 13, and Adam Crawford, 11, work together Saturday to fill bags of food for the Kids Against Hunger event at Memorial Baptist Church. The group prepared 10,000 meals, enough food to feed 16 people in Haiti for one year.

Abigail Witcher, 13, Billie McClain, 13, and Adam Crawford, 11, work together Saturday to fill bags of food for the Kids Against Hunger event at Memorial Baptist Church. The group prepared 10,000 meals, enough food to feed 16 people in Haiti for one year. Katie Alaimo/News Tribune

It took 21 50-pound bags of rice to pack 10,000 meals at Memorial Baptist Church on Saturday afternoon.

The meals are destined for Haiti through the Global Compassion Ministries’ program, Kids Against Hunger. The program’s goal is to pack 600,000 meals in 2014.

“They include a rice mixture with dehydrated vegetables, soy and a vitamin/mineral powder,” said Kari Sullivan, children’s minister at Memorial Baptist Church in Jefferson City. “This is our third year packing at the church.”

Nearly 80 kids and teenagers helped pack the meals. The packing was part of a day-long Mission Possible event at the church.

The event — which included six different workshops — was planned by the kids and was a chance for them to learn about living missionally.

Workshops included agriculture and job training, prayerwalking, games and sports, the Kids Against Hunger packing event, a clean water workshop and a military chaplain speaker.

The event also included lunch with dishes from places where the church has missionaries, including London, Sierra Leone, the Middle East and Haiti.

Sullivan said the Kids Against Hunger workshop, as well as the Mission Possible event, allows the kids to be active in solving world problems.

“We want them to feel like they can be a part of the solution,” she said.

Global Compassion will ship and deliver the packed meals to Haiti and will provide the Mission Possible kids with reports and pictures of the families receiving the meals.

“In Haiti, they’re sad people and don’t have a lot of hope,” said Jerry Lantz with Global Compassion. “When we bring the food, those gloomy faces turn to smiles, and they appreciate it.”

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