Living History & Apple Butter Festival offers glimpse into past

Stepping back in time with crafts, displays at Camden County Museum

Nancy Sckunecht, St. Louis, and Lorry Fridinger, Lynchburg, Va., demonstrate how to make lace by attaching thread to bobbins. The lace is used as an accessory on clothing and other household textiles.

Nancy Sckunecht, St. Louis, and Lorry Fridinger, Lynchburg, Va., demonstrate how to make lace by attaching thread to bobbins. The lace is used as an accessory on clothing and other household textiles. Photo by Ceil Abbott.

With storytellers, craft demonstrations, Civil War re-enactors, and heavenly tasting homemade apple butter, the Living History & Apple Butter Festival put on by the Camden County Historical Society offers something for the whole family.

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Rick Long and his son Zach, of Warsaw, Mo., demonstrate how to make lye soap using ingredients such as wood ashes and animal fat renderings.

The free event taking place this weekend at the Camden County Museum gives attendees a chance to learn about the day-to-day lives of their forefathers. The festival is staged by individuals from all over the country who work to preserve the arts and crafts of earlier years.

Throughout the weekend, whether it's making apple butter over an open fire, carving a wooden flute once used by Native Americans, making lye soap or staging a Civil War encampment, each of the tents set up on the museum grounds creates a microcosm of life in earlier times.

Inside the building there are handmade crafts and home baked goods for sale as well as handicraft demonstrations and several rooms set up in the fashion that was popular 150 years ago.

Today, Father Owen Henderson from St. George Episcopal Church will speak on the history of the church. He will offer communion. He will wear historic vestments as they were in the 1700s and 1800s including a black cassock, white surplice and green stole.

The Camden County Living History & Apple Butter Festival continues today on the grounds of the Camden County Museum at the junction of Highway 54 and State Rd. V in Linn Creek. The festival opens at 10 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m.

To find the Camden County Museum and the Living History & Apple Butter Festival, simply take U.S. Highway 54 to Linn Creek and watch for the signs.

Related link:

www.camdencountymuseum.com/Pages/Events2012.aspx

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