Levee holds as river hits 30.79

Curtis and Adam Strope paddle through Osage River floodwaters Sunday as they pass the $20 million railroad bridge being built across the river. Some of the materials for the project were underwater.

Curtis and Adam Strope paddle through Osage River floodwaters Sunday as they pass the $20 million railroad bridge being built across the river. Some of the materials for the project were underwater.

North Jefferson City appears to have dodged major flooding, and possibly by the thinnest margin ever.

The levy on the north side of the river was build to hold a 30-foot Missouri River, and appears to have held to 30.79 feet on Sunday.

By 8 p.m., the river had edged down to 30.65 feet, a drop of about 11⁄2 inches. It is expected to start receding and to go under 25 feet by Wednesday.

Still, the area wasn’t completely spared, as floodwater covered large sections of North Jefferson City, including the city parks department baseball and soccer fields near the overpass. No word on whether today’s t-ball/baseball games will be relocated, but a game set for Sunday was canceled.

Some people had thought the Missouri River had topped the levy, but it appeared to be flooding from a swollen Turkey Creek, which connects with the Missouri River in North Jefferson City.

The entrance to the former Cedar City area was barricaded, and a police officer stood guard to make sure people didn’t drive into the area, which also leads to community gardens, the Noren River Access and the Katy Trail.

Still, a steady stream of cars drove up to the area. One family wanting to go cycling in North Jefferson City was turned away by the officer.

Further north toward the bluffs, Midwest Premix was surrounded by water.

On the other side of U.S. 54/63, the airport and Nick’s Family Restaurant were on dry land and still open. Airplanes were cleared out of hangars and only one remained on the tarmac. An employee of Jefferson City Flying Service said they had just two flights at the airport as of 3:30 p.m. Sunday. At Nick’s, a pair of people were dining.

Matt Morasch, Jefferson City’s public works director, said Sunday there was flooding along low-lying roads in Jefferson City over the weekend, but that with no rain was forecast in the next couple of days, he was hopeful the threat was receding.

The weather service said more rain wasn’t expected in Missouri until later Tuesday.

“We’re on the way down now,” Morasch said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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