Fruit juice additive reduces fat in chocolate

British researchers come up with a novel way to make chocolate healthier

It's pretty well established that chocolate, especially dark chocolate, has health benefits. The problem is that chocolate is loaded with fat. 

But now British scientists have come up with a way to cut the fat content by adding tiny droplets of apple, orange and cranberry juice, using it to replace about half the fat.

The only potential problem is that it makes the chocolate taste kind of, well, fruity. That might not be a bad thing, depending on your individual tastes, but it might be offputting to some. The researchers are hoping they can use the same technique to substitute water and vitamin C for the fruit juice

The technique was developed by researchers at the University of Warwick and presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

Bon said he and his team are hoping candy companies will use the discovery to start making healthier, lower-fat chocolate. 

"Everyone loves chocolate, but unfortunately we all know that many chocolate bars are high in fat," said lead researcher Dr. Stefan Bon. "However it's the fat that gives chocolate all the indulgent sensations that people crave -- the silky smooth texture and the way it melts in the mouth but still has a 'snap' to it when you break it with your hand."

Currently, a two-ounce serving of dark chocolate may contain up to 13 grams of fat, about 20% of the daily recommended fat intake. There's also a lot of sugar in chocolate but the saving grace for chocolate is that it's rich in healthful plant-based substances known as antioxidants or flavonoids.

Bon's breakthrough is a good start. Now if someone can figure out to get rid of all that sugar.

Story provided by ConsumerAffairs.
Consumer Affairs

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