Chick-fil-A: Leave gay marriage debate to gov’t

In an Aug. 1, 2012 file photo, customers stand in line for a Chick-fil-A meal at the chain's restaurant in Wichita, Kan. The crowd was buying meals to show their support for the company that became embroiled in a controversy over same-sex marriage. Chick-fil-A issued a statement this week that the company had stopped funding organizations that oppose same-sex marriage.

In an Aug. 1, 2012 file photo, customers stand in line for a Chick-fil-A meal at the chain's restaurant in Wichita, Kan. The crowd was buying meals to show their support for the company that became embroiled in a controversy over same-sex marriage. Chick-fil-A issued a statement this week that the company had stopped funding organizations that oppose same-sex marriage. Photo by The Associated Press.

ATLANTA (AP) — A Georgia-based restaurant chain that drew national attention when its owner reaffirmed his opposition to same-sex marriage says it’s leaving the debate to politicians in the future.

Chick-fil-A issued a statement to that effect Wednesday when asked to comment on a claim earlier in the day that the company had stopped funding organizations that oppose same-sex marriage.

Chicago Alderman Joe Moreno announced the alleged policy change, which he said followed extended negotiations. He said as a result, he would no longer try to block a Chick-fil-A restaurant from opening in his district.

The company declined to comment beyond a statement saying it planned “to leave the policy debate over same-sex marriage to the government and political arena.”

Anti-gay groups listed as recipients of funds in the past declined to comment.

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