Obama says he's not 'hiding the ball' on Russia

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Speaking to the microphones intentionally this time, President Barack Obama on Tuesday assured he had no hidden agenda with Russia for a second term, seeking to contain a controversial gaffe that bounded all the way to the campaign trail at home and back again.

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U.S. President Barack Obama, left, waves as South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, center, and Chinese President Hu Jintao look at their marks on the floor Tuesday during a group photo session at the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul, South Korea.

Obama got caught on tape Monday telling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev that he would have more room to negotiate on missile defense after getting through a November election, presumably expecting to win and not have to face voters again.

Obama’s Republican rivals back home pounced, accusing him of secretive plotting and dealing over American national security. So one day later, with Medvedev at his side again, Obama tried some on the record candor and humor to put it all to rest.

The president’s explanation: He wants to work with Russia on the deeply divisive issue of a missile defense shield in Europe, knowing only by building trust first on that matter can he make gains on another goal of nuclear arms reductions. And there’s no way to expect progress during the politics of this election year, so he is already looking to 2013.

“This is not a matter of hiding the ball,” Obama said, well aware of criticism erupting at home. “I’m on record.”

Still, Obama had not meant for his initial political assessment to be heard. It was picked up by live microphones during a meeting with Medvedev and soon shot around the world. “This is my last election,” Obama was heard telling Medvedev, Russia’s outgoing president. “After my election, I have more flexibility.”

Obama showed up at a nuclear security summit ready to clarify his caught-on-tape words even at the risk of overshadowing his message for a second day. He fielded a question but failed to address the presumptuousness of plotting out 2013 strategy with Russia when, in fact, he must win election again for any of that to matter.

For Russia, the issues of nuclear weapons reduction and the proposed missile shield are related. Russian fears of new U.S. missiles at its doorstep in Europe have helped to stymie further progress on nuclear arms reductions after a breakthrough agreement two years ago.

Obama said he wants to spend the rest of this year working through technical issues with the Russians, and said it was not surprising a deal couldn’t be completed quickly.

“I don’t think it’s any surprise that you can’t start that a few months before presidential and congressional elections in the United States, and at a time when they just completed elections in Russia, and they’re in the process of a presidential transition,” Obama told reporters. He spoke after making a separate announcement on nuclear security.

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