Obama will give address at Joplin graduation

President Barack Obama addresses thousands at the opening session of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee's (AIPAC) annual policy conference Sunday.

President Barack Obama addresses thousands at the opening session of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee's (AIPAC) annual policy conference Sunday. Photo by The Associated Press.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama will speak at the high school graduation ceremony in Joplin, the Missouri city slowly recovering after being struck by a devastating tornado a year ago.

The White House said Obama will deliver remarks at the May 21 commencement. The president will also speak at the May 14 commencement address for Barnard College and the May 23 graduation ceremony at the Air Force Academy.

Obama last visited Joplin in May 2011, just days after the massive tornado hit. More than 160 people were killed, including seven students and one staff member at the high school, making it the worst tornado to strike the U.S. in decades. Joplin High School was among the thousands of homes and buildings destroyed.

Speaking at a memorial service in Joplin last year, Obama pledged to residents that “your country will be there with you every single step of the way.”

The killer tornado struck the city of 50,000 less than an hour after the local high school wrapped up its 2011 graduation ceremonies. Will Norton, one of the students receiving a diploma that day, was killed in the storm.

With Joplin High leveled by the tornado, this year’s seniors have been attending classes at a nearby mall. Other schools in the area have moved to temporary locations in abandoned warehouses and industrial buildings.

Despite the immense challenges, school officials pride themselves on having started the school year on schedule. While they expected a steep decline in enrollment, officials say about 95 percent of students returned to attend classes in Joplin this year.

Obama traditionally delivers the commencement address at a different military service academy every spring.

In Joplin, student government leaders and a hand-picked group of seniors learned of the presidential visit first thing Monday morning, superintendent C.J. Huff said.

Huff’s office worked out the details with the White House last week, gladly agreeing to delay the graduation ceremony by one day since the president will be in Chicago for the G-8 and NATO summits the preceding several days.

“The kids were genuinely excited,” Huff said. “They’ve grown up a lot this year, just like all the rest of us. Having the president here shines a spotlight on these kids, and all they’ve been able to accomplish.”

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Please review our Policies and Procedures before registering or commenting

News Tribune - comments