Proponents say Internet sales tax would level playing field

Dan Eiken of Samco, an office and business supply store in Jefferson City, talks with a customer. Eiken is a proponent of a sales tax on Internet sales.

Dan Eiken of Samco, an office and business supply store in Jefferson City, talks with a customer. Eiken is a proponent of a sales tax on Internet sales. Photo by Julie Smith.

Like many Jefferson City area businesses, Samco Business Products supports the local community through both taxes and through donations to local charities.

But not only do his biggest online competitors not support the community, they also don’t collect the 7.75 percent sales tax that Samco does.

“How absurd is that?” owner Dan Eiken asked. “I just don’t understand that. We invest in the community and state, and we’re at a disadvantage.”

Requiring online vendors to pay state and local sales taxes “seems like a no-brainer to me,” he said.

Lawmakers supporting an online sales tax will make another push at the Missouri Capitol this session.

Read additional details in our newspaper or e-Edition. Newspaper subscribers: Click on an e-Edition article and log in using your current account information at no extra charge. For e-edition help, e-mail circ@newstribune.com. Click here to purchase the full version of archived articles.

News Tribune Facebook Question

Brick-and-mortar business owners face a big disadvantage in that they must collect sales tax while their online competitors don’t. Lawmakers are getting ready to make another push for an Internet sales tax during this session. Are you more likely to save a few dollars by buying online or do you support local businesses? Would you back an online sales tax?

Visit the News Tribune Facebook Page to answer this question and read others' responses.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Please review our Policies and Procedures before registering or commenting

News Tribune - comments