Local churches foster fair-trade connections

Children look over a collection of Central and South American Fair Trade items for sale during Living Windows at First Presbyterian Church.

Children look over a collection of Central and South American Fair Trade items for sale during Living Windows at First Presbyterian Church. Photo by Kris Wilson.

Above the fresh aroma wafting from the brewed fair-trade coffee is a sign “Good Coffee for a Good Cause.”

The local Unitarian Universalist Fellowship relies on its coffee counter as a source of Sunday socialization and its morning beverage service.

Within the last decade, they also were able to incorporate other congregational principles through Equal Exchange coffees and chocolates.

“We believe in the inherent worth and dignity of every person, we support the democratic process, and we encourage environmentally safe practices,” said fair trade organizer Kath Connor.

She orders for the fellowship’s use at the church and extra for others who use the fair trade coffee personally, too. By promoting the concept at the shared church coffee counter, Connor said she hopes to encourage more congregation members and visitors to incorporate the practice into their daily lives.

“We can do the right thing and have good coffee, too,” Connor said.

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Similarly, fair trade crafts and goods have become a Christmas tradition at First Presbyterian Church as an alternative giving method for its members.

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