Service 'radiantly defined' King

MLK celebration honors kindred spirits, acts of youths

South School students Jasmine Lett, left, and Hope Lewis provide a musical interlude with schoolmates during Friday’s Martin Luther King Day of Service Ceremony at the Governor Office Building.

South School students Jasmine Lett, left, and Hope Lewis provide a musical interlude with schoolmates during Friday’s Martin Luther King Day of Service Ceremony at the Governor Office Building. Photo by Julie Smith.

Service was a dominant theme during a celebration Friday of the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

In advance of Monday’s holiday, the Jefferson City Regional Martin Luther King Committee brought together speakers, singers and dancers to highlight, interpret and champion King’s commitment to serve his fellow man.

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Mallory Klindt, left, and Arielle Chambers, middle, discuss the research that went into the making of their second-place Day of Service poster, on top, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. At right is Dani Mann, who won first place in the essay contest. All three are seniors at Helias High School.

“Martin Luther King wanted us to know each other personally,” said Bill Miller, the featured speaker. “He brought hope and healing to America.”

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