Event ‘welcomes home’ Vietnam veterans

Former soldiers share stories

Charlie Plumb, a Vietnam Veteran speaks to the crowd about his experiences in Vietnam and as a prisoner of war at the “It’s Never Too Late To Welcome The Home” event held Saturday at The First United Methodist Church in Jefferson City.

Charlie Plumb, a Vietnam Veteran speaks to the crowd about his experiences in Vietnam and as a prisoner of war at the “It’s Never Too Late To Welcome The Home” event held Saturday at The First United Methodist Church in Jefferson City. Photo by Deborah Cote.

Whether it was the six years Charlie Plumb spent in a communist prison camp, or the day that changed Don Hentges’ life forever, or the questions curious friends asked Art Fillmore, each Vietnam veteran has a reason for why they speak now and why they may not have spoken of their experiences for some time.

Hengtes works tirelessly in veterans groups and at events, to remember the death of his friend who died from his injuries in Vietnam. Hengtes was injured by the same explosive device, but swore to his friend he would not be forgotten.

Fillmore, now a lawyer in Kansas City, refused to speak about his experiences in Vietnam for a period of time. “I had nightmares for 15 years; I needed to talk about it,” he said.

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Plumb spent six years in a communist prison camp, and shortly after he returned to the Midwest, he knew there was a message he could share.

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